Last edited by Tygogul
Thursday, April 16, 2020 | History

2 edition of Purchasing power parities in five East African countries found in the catalog.

Purchasing power parities in five East African countries

Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda

by Noureddine Krichene

  • 40 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by International Monetary Fund, African Department in [Washington, D.C.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Purchasing power parity -- Africa, East.,
  • Foreign exchange rates -- Africa, East.,
  • Prices -- Africa, East.,
  • Trade blocs -- Africa, East.,
  • Competition -- Africa, East.,
  • Labor productivity -- Africa, East.,
  • Labor market -- Africa, East.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementprepared by Noureddine Krichene.
    SeriesIMF working paper -- WP/98/148
    ContributionsInternational Monetary Fund. African Dept.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination37 p. :
    Number of Pages37
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18572783M


Share this book
You might also like
Código penal.

Código penal.

Proceeds of Crime Bill

Proceeds of Crime Bill

The worlds forests

The worlds forests

Memories & sketches

Memories & sketches

Classified list of references on comprehensive education

Classified list of references on comprehensive education

The call of steam

The call of steam

Affordable housing

Affordable housing

Perseus

Perseus

Health counseling

Health counseling

Hoard of Coins of William the Conqueror found in a trench in the War Area.

Hoard of Coins of William the Conqueror found in a trench in the War Area.

Pro bono publico

Pro bono publico

Bill Brandt

Bill Brandt

Network security management

Network security management

Souvenir book, UN visits Tennessee

Souvenir book, UN visits Tennessee

Meromorphic functions over non-archimedean fields

Meromorphic functions over non-archimedean fields

Advanced Readings and Communicative Activities for Oral Proficiency

Advanced Readings and Communicative Activities for Oral Proficiency

Purchasing power parities in five East African countries by Noureddine Krichene Download PDF EPUB FB2

Purchasing power parity (PPP) is a measurement of prices in different countries that uses the prices of specific goods to compare the absolute purchasing power of the countries' many cases, PPP produces an inflation rate that is equal to the price of the basket of goods at one location divided by the price of the basket of goods at a different location.

Purchasing Power Parities in Five East African Countries: Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda. Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda this paper finds that bilateral real exchange rates revert to a long-term equilibrium in line with purchasing power parities, implying that these countries constitute an integrated trading.

Get this from a library. Purchasing power parities in five East African countries: Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda.

[Noureddine Krichene; International Monetary Fund. African Department.] -- Annotation In a case study of Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Purchasing power parities in five East African countries book, and Uganda, this paper finds that bilateral real exchange rates revert to a long-term equilibrium in line with purchasing.

Downloadable. In a case study of Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda, this paper finds that bilateral real exchange rates revert to a long-term equilibrium in line with purchasing power parities, implying that these countries constitute an integrated trading zone, their markets are interdependent and arbitrage works efficiently, and intraregional competitiveness is preserved.

In a case study of Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda, this paper finds that bilateral real exchange rates revert to a long-term equilibrium in line with purchasing power parities, implying that these countries constitute an integrated trading zone, their markets are interdependent and arbitrage works efficiently, and intraregional competitiveness is by: Purchasing power parities (PPPs) are the rates of currency conversion that try to equalise the purchasing power of different currencies, by eliminating the differences in price levels between countries.

A nation's GDP at purchasing power parity (PPP) exchange rates is the sum value of all goods and services produced in the country valued at prices prevailing in the United States in the year noted.

This is the measure most economists prefer when looking at per-capita welfare and when comparing living conditions or use of resources across countries. EUROSTAT-OECD Methodological manual on purchasing power parities (PPPs) Benchmark PPPs - Measurement and Uses (OECD Statistics Brief N.

17, March ) Purchasing power parities - measurement and uses (OECD Statistics Brief N. 3, March ) Specific Purchasing Power parities for. time frame, and in institutional partnership.

It estimates purchasing power parities (PPPs) for use as currency converters to compare the size and price levels of economies around the world.

The previous round of the program, for reference yearcovered File Size: 3MB. The paper revisits the issue of poverty-specific purchasing power parities (PPPs), using the most recent () International Comparison Program (ICP) results.

The World Bank's global poverty count uses a common international poverty line -- currently $ at international prices—based on Author: Yuri M. Dikhanov, Nada Hamadeh, William Vigil Oliver, Tefera Bekele Degefu, Inyoung Song.

Noureddine Krichene, "Purchasing Power Parities in Five East African Countries; Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda," IMF Working Papers 98/, International Monetary Fund.

Frenkel, Jacob A., "The collapse of purchasing power parities during the 's," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages Purchasing Power Parities and the Real Size of World Economies A Comprehensive Report of the International Comparison Program A Comprehensive Report of the Purchasing Power Parities and regional estimates—the African Development Bank, Asian Development Bank, Interstate File Size: 5MB.

Poverty-specific purchasing power parities in Africa (English) Abstract. The paper revisits the issue of poverty-specific purchasing power parities (PPPs), using the most recent () International Comparison Program (ICP) : Yuri M.

Dikhanov, Nada Hamadeh, William Vigil Oliver, Tefera Bekele Degefu, Inyoung Song. Global Firepower tracks the Purchasing Power Parity (abbreviated as PPP) of each GFP participant. PPP serves as an economic adjustor to satisfy exchange rates between countries in relation to exhange of similar goods.

This can have a positive or negative effect on domestic currencies in play as well as supply-and-demand. An Empirical Test of Purchasing Power Parity in Selected African Countries - a Panel Data Approach Beatrice Kalinda Mkenda Department of Economics P O Box SE 30 Göteborg SWEDEN.

[email protected] Abstract The paper tests whether the theory of Purchasing Power Parity holds in a selected sample of twenty African countries. International Comparison Program (ICP) The ICP is a worldwide statistical initiative led by the World Bank under the auspices of the United Nations Statistical Commission, with the main objective of providing comparable price and volume measures of gross domestic product (GDP) and its expenditure aggregates among countries within and across regions.

Purchasing power parity (PPP) is an economic theory that allows the comparison of the purchasing power of various world currencies to one another. It is a theoretical exchange rate that allows you to buy the same amount of goods and services in every country.

Government agencies use PPP to compare the output of countries that use different. Purchasing power parities, abbreviated as PPPs, are indicators of price level differences across tell us how many currency units a given quantity of goods and services costs in different countries.

Using PPPs to convert expenditure expressed in national currencies into an artificial common currency, the purchasing power standard (PPS), eliminates the effect of price level.

The paper tests whether the theory of Purchasing Power Parity holds in a selected sample of twenty African countries. The paper employs a panel unit root test to test whether the real exchange Author: Beatrice Kalinda Mkenda.

This article presents a summary of the results of the latest () round of the International Comparison Program (ICP). The ICP is a worldwide statistical partnership to collect comparative price data and compile detailed expenditure values of countries’ gross domestic product (GDP), and to estimate purchasing power parities (PPPs) of the world’s economies.

Sarno & M.P. Taylor,() Purchasing Power Parity and the Real Exchange Rate, IMF Staff Papers, Vol 49/1.

Mkenda, B. () an Empirical Test of Purchasing Power Parity in Selected African Countries-A Panel Data Approach, PhD Thesis, University of Goteborg, Department of Economics. The publication presents the detailed results of the International Comparison Program (ICP).

The ICP is a worldwide statistical initiative that aims to estimate Purchasing Power Parities (PPPs) to be used as currency converters to compare the size and price levels of economies around the : Paperback. Purchasing power parity and cross-sectional dependency. An African panel Article in South African Journal of Economics 72(2) June with 16 Reads.

The ICP Book, Measuring the Real Size of the World Economy: The Framework, Methodology, and Results of the International Comparison Program (ICP), is the most comprehensive accounting ever presented by the ICP of the theory and methods underlying the estimation of purchasing power parities (PPPs).

PPPs reveal the relative sizes of economies by. Purchasing Power Parities It is well understood that international comparisons of GDP at market exchange rates are deceptive about real income disparities.

The main reason is that some commodities are not internationally traded, thus removing the economic mechanism for. Purchasing power parities are needed because similar goods and services have widely varying prices across countries when converted to a common currency using market exchange rates.

Differences are greatest in sectors not commonly traded internationally, such as housing, construction and health and education services. Purchasing Power Parities and the Real Size of World Economies respectively. The Democratic Republic of Congo, Liberia, and the Comoros were the lowestranked economies, according to real actual.

Prices and Purchasing Power Parities. Consumer and Producer Price Indices. Consumer price indices (CPIs) - Complete database. Consumer price indices (CPIs) - Complete database. Health at a Glance compares key indicators for population health and health system performance across OECD members, candidate and partner countries.

It highlights how countries differ in terms of the health status and health-seeking behaviour of their citizens; access to and quality of health care; and the resources available for health. The ICP produced estimates of purchasing power parities (PPPs), real expenditures, and price level indexes for countries around the world, making it the largest statistical exercise undertaken on a.

This paper seeks to quantify existing financial barriers among East African Community (EAC) member countries based on analysis of each member country's foreign exchange market. The primary contribution of this paper is the generation of an aggregate measure of financial barriers for the three relatively more advanced members (Kenya, Uganda, and.

PREFACE. This publication makes available internationally comparable estimates of real gross domestic product (GDP) for the reference year The real values of GDP and its expenditure components (such as household consumption, government services and capital formation) presented in this study were obtained by applying conversion rates, called purchasing power parities (PPPs), instead of.

Comparing Poverty Across Countries: The Role of Purchasing Power Parities HIGHLIGHTS Table 1 compares the 16 Asian countries’ market exchange rates in with PPPs from the ICP. The PPPs pertain to GDP and three of its major subcomponents. There are two important features of the table.

First, the PPPs are lower. Journal of African DevelopmentPurchasing Power Parity for African Countries: The Impact of the “Great Recession” Christian Nsiah Abstract We investigate both the weak and strong forms of PPP between 33 African countries, the United States, Euro area, South Africa, and Nigeria.

The study applies panel unit root tests. The World Bank itself, in a report on its most recent estimates of purchasing power parities and real expenditures, published inset out the data demands that estimates of global poverty numbers require: Global poverty numbers require a large and varied set of data collected from different places, time periods, and by: 1.

It presents definitive results (purchasing power parities and related economic indicators) for those countries which took part in the European Comparison Programme under Eurostat's co-ordination for the year Part One presents background information, including a description of methodology.

Value & Rank The GDP - Purchasing Power Parity of Ghana is (billions of $) with a global rank of Ghana compared to other Countries The GDP - Purchasing Power Parity of Ghana is similar to that of Syrian Arab Republic, Bulgaria, Azerbaijan, Dominican Republic, Oman, Sudan, Guatemala, Serbia, Kenya, Tanzania with a respective GDP - Purchasing Power Parity of,For the South African to purchase the same item in the United States for R, the exchange rate would have to be R7/$ – and this is known as the purchasing power parity (PPP) exchange rate.

Measured at the actual exchange rate of R9/$, the value of the item in South Africa would be $70 (/9). Comparison of purchasing power parity between the United States and Canada Purchasing power parities determine expenditures for real gross domestic product among countries without the use of the exchange rate to convert currencies; parities more accurately reflect the rate at which currency in one country can be converted to buyFile Size: 1MB.

What is purchasing power parity (PPP). Each country describes their economic data, such as Gross Domestic Product (GDP), GDP per Capita, income or poverty, in their own currency.

In order to make comparisons among countries, all of the currencies have to be made equivalent, This is most commonly done by making the national currencies comparable to the US dollar, by figuring out how. The Gross Domestic Product per capita in South Africa was last recorded at US dollars inwhen adjusted by purchasing power parity (PPP).

The GDP per Capita, in South Africa, when adjusted by Purchasing Power Parity is equivalent to 68 percent of the world's average. GDP per capita PPP in South Africa averaged USD from untilreaching an all time high of Purchasing power parity implies: A) A basket of goods should sell for the same price in all countries, even if trade barriers exist: B) A basket of goods will sell for the same price in all countries as long as there are no trade barriers: C) A basket of goods cannot sell for the same price in different countries due to the different wage rates: D).

Graph and download economic data for Total Factor Productivity Level at Current Purchasing Power Parities for Philippines (CTFPPPPHANRUG) from to about Philippines, productivity, and PPP.